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Teach Your Child To Read In A 100 Easy Lessons

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Items 1 - 6 of 6
  • Item #: 002274
    ISBN: 9780671631987
    Retail: $24.00
    Rainbow Price: $13.25

    Four years after using this book to learn to read at age 4, our twins would still take this book off the shelf and re-read the silly stories that made learning to read immediately rewarding. It is a phonics-based, non-consumable book authored by Siegfried Engelmann using the DISTAR method. Faced with two small children eager to read like their older sisters, but who were not ready for the more intensive writing and spelling accompanying most other reading programs, I was at a loss. All they needed at this tender age were enough decoding skills to enable them to read. We had already covered letter sounds (via song), so the twins literally zipped through the early lessons and quickly digested blends, vowel sounds, and digraphs, thoroughly enjoying every lesson. In fact, they begged for "extra" lessons, anxious to get to the next story! Large, bold type assures learning without eye strain. This volume filled a need in our own family and, judging from the numerous requests/recommendations by our customers, has done so for others as well.

  • Item #: 015932
    ISBN: 9781514787076
    Retail: $22.50
    Rainbow Price: $18.50

    This workbook includes 100 Bible verses for children to copy and learn. Parents work with their child by reading and talking about the verse and having the child recite the verse several times to commit to memory. Every few lessons include sight words to copy. There is also space for children to write their three favorite words from each verse and use their creativity by illustrating the verse. Verses 85-100 are written in cursive and a couple of pages are devoted to practicing upper and lowercase cursive letters. The designed borders on each page are black and white and fun to color. Bible verses use NKJV. ~ Gina

  • Item #: 000437
    ISBN: 9781118022436
    Retail: $32.95
    Rainbow Price: $20.75

    Subtitled "Clear Steps to Easy Reading and Perfect Spelling," this volume lives up to its name. Using a Basic Phonics approach (aka "pure" phonics), no sight words are introduced until basic decoding and reading skills are well-established. Even then, such words are introduced in clusters according to sound and spelling pattern so that they may be more easily learned. If you are familiar with other phonics programs, this one strikes me as a cross between Teach Your Child to Read in 100 Easy Lessons and Alpha-Phonics. It is well organized, systematic, incremental, and thorough in its presentation. Instructions are clear and lessons require no preparation time. After reading through the brief introduction, you can sit right down with the book and your child, spending 10-15 minutes a day on the lessons. If you feel overwhelmed or ill-equipped to teach your child to read, you should be able to succeed with this program because the author has already done the "legwork" for you. She provides it all - how to present and explain each phonogram, spelling rules that apply, reviews, exercises and helpful tips. Additionally, the author includes exercises for vision/motor coordination exercises (which are apparently identical to ones prescribed by ophthalmologists for problems with eye strength or tracking). Testimonials abound, with success stories in regular classrooms, from home schoolers, with learning disabled children, and with older and remedial students. The approach is multisensory, so it will be just as usable with a visual learner as an auditory or kinesthetic one. Going beyond teaching phonograms, the book covers contractions, plural forms, homonyms and homophones, homographs, prefixes, suffixes, and compound words. An additional helpful feature is the attention given to syllabication. The author's approach here makes it possible for the young reader to confidently tackle even the longest words. As she so aptly states, "How children learn may be different - but what they learn should be the same. Everyone should be able to decode even the longest unfamiliar words, syllable by syllable." Indeed, the book progresses from "a" to "A strong foundation to a house is indispensable" with sure mastery of skills in between. Typeface for the student to read is large (24 pt) so as not to strain the eyes and both printed and written forms of "a" and "g" are taught. The program is self-contained with no supplemental readers or materials required (though you will probably want to supply your student with additional reading material at his skill level). Welcome additions to the 10th edition include: pictures illustrating every sound introduced, lessons in dividing multi-syllable words, and nonsense word reviews to ensure learning. The paperback format also features easy-to-copy, lay-flat pages. The appropriate integration of spelling rules into the phonics lessons (reminiscent of An Acorn in My Hand) make this an excellent spelling reference also. Little proverbs of encouragement, both for teacher and student, are sprinkled generously throughout. One oddity of the book is that it seems to be written from a third person point of view - speaking to the student but, at times, addressing both you and the student as though the author was there speaking to both of you (kind of like a phonics facilitator). This threw me in the first bank of instructions, but, after that, its references to the teacher as a separate entity disappear, and the text can be used as your verbal instruction to your child. The completeness, ease of use, and relatively low cost of this program should make it valuable to homeschoolers as their basal phonics curriculum.

  • Item #: 047604
    ISBN: 9781934338391
    Retail: $27.95
    Rainbow Price: $17.96

    If you have a middle school (or older) student who is a striving (a.k.a. struggling) reader, you are aware of two things. First, you are desperate to help them. Striving readers often derail in decoding ability because they guess at multi-syllabic words based only on beginning phonemes. In essence, they are reading only a small percentage of the words – usually sight words – and their comprehension is affected. After that it's a downward spiral as self-image is impacted. Second, there aren't a lot of affordable, effective resources available. Organized around the six basic English syllable patterns and providing instructional sequences, games, and activities that appeal to older students and make it easy on the teacher (a.k.a. Mom and Dad), this manual provides a solution to both dilemmas. (I think it would also work well as a follow-up to Teach Your Child to Read in 100 Easy Lessons.)

    The six syllable patterns – CVC, CV, Cle, R-control, CVCC, CVVC – are taught in order. Each pattern is covered in a chapter full of lessons spread over 1-3 weeks. To round out the decoding instruction, concluding chapters cover the hard and soft "c" and "g" sounds as well as the sounds of /sh/ (because they are confusing); there are 15 weeks of instruction overall. Lessons are detailed – but not quite scripted – and start with a Do Now segment which serves as an informal diagnostic tool. Mini-lessons are presented, usually over one to two days, followed by guided practice. All teaching segments are kept short (10-20 minutes) which works best for the student but is also an advantage for busy moms. Since the ever-present goal is automaticity (students being able to decode automatically), the teacher can judge how much practice is needed and choose to add, repeat, or skip various components. Guided practice includes graphic organizers, worksheets, and games. Each chapter ends with a post-test using nonsense or "pseudo" words, a technique which avoids a dependence on sight-reading.

    If this sounds confusing, you won't be confused by the detailed scope and sequence that provides a roadmap through the chapters and the teaching sequences. At a glance you can see the suggested time frame for each chapter, time to allow for each lesson, and the materials needed. The accompanying CD-ROM saves in prep time. It provides PDF versions of the book's reproducibles, assessments, and full-color game materials. Many of the game materials are cards, so I would suggest printing them out on cardstock. It's recommended that you use an individual-sized whiteboard and dry erase markers for student responses. Since this resource was developed with a classroom in mind, there are references to pair-work and some group activities. I don't think it will be too tricky to adapt these to the homeschool setting and can see value in bringing siblings into the mix for some of the games. Answers, where needed, are provided right with the exercises. 183 pgs, pb ~ Janice

  • Item #: 043358
    ISBN: 9780967634906
    Retail: $79.00
    Rainbow Price: $35.84

    While it may sound ambitious to think your child can learn letter sounds, letter recognition, blending sounds, reading, writing, spelling and typing all in one program, this well-produced and engaging software may help them do just that. It is made up of two CD-ROMs: Read, Write & Type! and Spaceship Challenge. Read, Write & Type! is the core of the program and provides the instruction, while Spaceship Challenge provides assessment. There are 40 lessons in Read, Write & Type! with a new letter or sound introduced in each one until children have learned the basic 40 speech sounds in English. These sounds include 21 which are represented by one consonant, 5 represented by two consonants (sh, th, ch, wh, and ng), the short and long sounds of each vowel, and then "oo" as in both "look" and "tool," "ou" as in "loud," and "aw" as in "hawk." The lessons are grouped into levels where four letters or sounds are learned at each level. If you follow the plan provided, children will complete one level in Read, Write & Type! before they switch to Spaceship Challenge for testing on what they've learned (starting after Level 2). The lessons are based around games, so learning is a fun and interactive experience. When you begin the program, the user can view the introduction to learn the back-story and be introduced to the characters (or storytellers). Most of the time the screen you will see includes a keyboard with keys divided under right and left "houses" and two little hands in the corners. The player also sees that each of the letters (and corresponding storyteller) "live" in a key shown on the animated keyboard. Above the keyboard, the scene changes as the user plays different games. In the introduction Vexor, a nasty virus, comes to town and steals all the letters from the animated keyboard. It's up to the player and the two talking hands to work together to win all of the letters back. As the player begins each round, they see which letter Vexor will offer to give back, pending the player's performance on the games. The player is instructed on how to type that letter on the keyboard, and the sound of the letter is pronounced (letters found on the left-hand side of the keyboard within easy reach are the first to be introduced). The player then plays a series of games with Vexor to try and win the letter. These are based heavily on sound and ask the child to associate the sound with a picture and determine if the sound is made when saying the name of the object in the picture. Different games test the player's ability to identify the sound at the beginning, in the middle, or at the end of words. Players are constantly encouraged to say the name of the pictures or the sounds of the letters out loud as they type to engage their eyes, ears, mouths and fingers to learn the letters and sounds. After they play the letter/sound games with Vexor, they must help the letter's storyteller get to the Story Tree by typing the letters they hear pronounced by an animated mouth. At the Story Tree, the mouth again pronounces the sounds of letters, and later words and simple sentences, as they type to complete the story. The games are different in Spaceship Challenge, although the emphasis is still on recognizing sounds and matching to letters. In the Sound Game, a picture shows one of three different monitors, and the player will identify the sound at the beginning, in the middle, or at the end of the word pictured. The Reading Game tests reading comprehension by asking the player to match the sentence or word to one of the pictures shown below. In the Spelling Game, a picture is shown and the word is pronounced, and the player is asked to type in the word correctly. If the player completes these tasks at or above the threshold for passing, they move on to the next level in Read, Write & Type! Additional fun reinforcement activities include the Power Fountain game which reinforces typing accuracy and speed, and a simulated e-mail area, where children can type and "send" messages (a selection of stored responses are "sent" in return). The spiral-bound lesson book also includes plenty of introductory material for parents, including an overview of the program, a scope and sequence, suggestions for students of different ages/abilities, explanations of the games in the software, and more (please note that the book does reference some additional pieces like posters and keyboard covers that have not been included with the program for quite some time). All in all, this program has some good things going for it. The software is well-produced, not cheesy, and the sounds that are pronounced are clear and easy to understand. Because the emphasis is on learning the sounds, not just letter recognition (players are even asked to type "fffff," not "F"), this aids them in learning to sound out and recognize words later on. The games are fun to play and motivational, and the range of supplementary materials included and available (some on their website) round out the program to include non-computer time. Additionally, children will get plenty of typing practice with no pressure for speed, which gives them a leg up on children who don't learn to type until they are older. While I wouldn't use this in place of a phonics program, it is a meaty supplement that may be best used with a "no-frills" instruction book like How to Teach Your Child to Read in 100 Easy Lessons, Reading Made Easy or The Ordinary Parents Guide to Teaching Reading and/or with phonics workbooks (to reinforce writing skills which are not used as much in the software). This will provide practice they'll want to do! Please note that this is the 2000 edition of the program on CD-ROM; the newest version is only available from Talking Fingers as a download.System requirements: Windows 95/98/Me/NT/2000/XP/Vista (but not Windows 7); Macintosh 7.5-9.2 or OS X Classic. - Jess

  • Item #: 037523
    ISBN: 9780982066607
    Retail: $27.00
    Rainbow Price: $26.95

    Indeed a sound approach to reading, this program is a solid, phonetically comprehensive program with reinforcing reading text incorporated directly in the book. It reminds me somewhat of a cross between Alphaphonics and Teach Your Child to Read in 100 Easy Lessons, but with improved teacher instruction, lesson implementation, and textual presentation. As in those popular programs, your child will begin reading as soon as the first letter sounds are taught. And, in a mere 90 "byte-sized" lessons, your child will be reading at a beginning 3rd grade reading level. This program is also recommended for both remedial and ELL students. In fact, the school version of this program it is currently being used in more than 20 elementary schools, two middle schools, and one high school.

    Prior to beginning the lessons in this book, your child should have letter name and recognition skills and some phonemic awareness (the author provides background and methods for teaching these, or use another product that teaches these skills; see our Early Childhood section). You will want to read all of the preliminary teacher pages before actually starting lessons; otherwise you will miss out on helpful background information and other resources provided for you. While instruction in each lesson is devoted to reading, the author presents a great spelling methodology, complete with word lists, to integrate with lessons along with (brief) guidelines for incorporating handwriting, vocabulary, and creative writing into the program. Also in the intro section are specific instructions for teaching letter sounds, blending, playing Scramble Spell, and other implementation directions which would be redundant to include in each lesson. You should also teach the first four letter sounds introduced (a, t, s, c) BEFORE lesson 1-1, using the approach outlined in the teacher section. Here, the author strongly recommends using a set of flashcards WITHOUT pictures on them (such as the Alphabet Basics cards we've included below).

    The program teaches roughly 80 common sound/spelling patterns, based on the Orton-Gillingham phonograms as well as nearly all of the 100 most common sight words. I appreciate the author's sentiment below her Sequence of Skills table as she says, "Words from the list of 100 most common sight words that are not listed here are words that are decodable," as this echoes one of my pet peeves. Too many programs introduce phonetically decodable words as "sight words". Other features that captivate my heart for phonetic instruction are: integrated review of previously-learned sounds in each lesson; large, readable font with initial extra spacing between words and letters; immediate phonetic skill reinforcement in reading selections; word "play" incorporated into spelling lessons; longer "introduction" of each short vowel sound to prevent confusion; emphasis on blending from the beginning; and helpful review of phonograms by phoneme (yes!) in the latter lessons.

    Prior to the first lesson, a "How to Teach Sound Bytes Lessons" section concisely recaps directions in the teacher section of the book. Most lessons follow a similar format. Previously introduced sounds are reviewed, 1-2 new sounds are introduced, sight words (if any) are presented, new sounds are practiced in words, then sentences, and a story using only old and newly learned sounds and sight words is read. Lessons should take from 15-30 minutes per day. Lessons are generally grouped into units of 5 (lesson 1-1, 1-2, 1-3, 1-4, 1-5), though there is no apparent reason for the grouping (maybe to accommodate a 5-day school week?). Units are also divided into chapters. Chapter One (38 lessons) teaches letter sounds and CVC words, ending with an impressively-long reading selection. Chapter Two (10 lessons) focuses on long vowel, silent-e constructions. Chapter Three (25 lessons) covers more advanced phonemes like r-controlled vowels, vowel digraphs, silent letters, and multi-syllabic words. Chapter Four (17 lessons) is "Challenge". Here is the synthesis of phonograms by sound as well as some final review and a list of additional sound patterns not included in the lessons. Font size and spacing between letters and words on the student pages tapers as the student progresses but, even at the end, is not too small or tight for an early reader. Line drawings scattered throughout the volume are sparse, attractive and non-distracting.

    The author suggests that your child practice handwriting the capital letters when learning letter NAMES and practice handwriting lower-case letters when learning the letter SOUNDS in this program. This can be done informally with a ruled white board (or paper) and marker or by using a beginning handwriting book (see descriptions and graphics on our website).

    I would strongly suggest incorporating the author's Scramble Spell game (word lists included) into most lessons rather than a standard spelling program, especially for beginning readers. This provides additional reinforcement for newly-learned sounds and adds a kinesthetic element to the lessons. By making additional words from an initial "base" word you explore onsets and rimes, word building, and practice encoding without all of the writing and rewriting that might turn your fun learning session into "work". A set of paper letter "cards" is provided in the book, but you may want to use a ready-made set of letter tiles or manipulatives for this (some suggestions below). If you want your child to have more practice actually writing words, follow her advice for incorporating creative writing into the program. Even the youngest students will enjoy making their own books that align with their budding language skills.

    The author suggests following up her program by having your child read books from a carefully sequenced list included at the end of the book. She thoughtfully provides lexile scores, implementation instructions, and further resources for locating other appropriate reading materials.