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Draw Europe

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Items 1 - 8 of 8
  • Item #: 064784
    ISBN: 9781514150160
    Retail: $19.95
    Rainbow Price: $18.50
  • Item #: 061280
    ISBN: 9781940282480
    Retail: $25.95
    Rainbow Price: $24.95
  • Item #: 071237
    ISBN: 9781849944007
    Retail: $14.95
    Rainbow Price: $10.95

     Forty-five of the 20th century’s most famous buildings, from a wide variety of architects, have been transformed into challenging dot-to-dot puzzles. The numbers are tiny and there are lots of them! Most puzzles go into the 200s, but some go into the 500s. There are some simple lines that give hints and the solutions are in the back. It would be fun to do some further research into the various styles! You could color in the finished image to match the real building and have a reference book when you’re done! 9.75x9.75”, sc. ~ Sara

  • Item #: 043809
    ISBN: 9780794537555
    Retail: $5.99
    Rainbow Price: $5.69

  • Item #: 070329
    Retail: $49.99
    Rainbow Price: $38.95

     

      You are a member of a noble family leveraging for power in European courts, ousting kings and dukes alike in favor of those partial to your cause. In this Ticket-to-Ride-like game, players take turns drawing and playing sets of colored cards (representing England, France, Germany, and Spain) to place nobles in cities throughout Europe. Intrigue Cards allow players to depose opponent’s nobles and place their own! This adds a wonderful layer of strategy and tension to the game. Acquire the most victory points by placing nobles in key cities and earning bonuses. Being the first player to acquire a noble in a city, having a noble in every city of a country, and having one of each type of noble (Marshal through King) earns bonuses. Three “Time Periods” also divide the game and allow for scoring: whoever is the most and second-most influential in a country gains major bonuses. When three periods are completed, final scoring takes place and the player with the most victory points wins. 2-5 players; 60 minutes.

  • Item #: 049861
    ISBN: 9781632206503
    Retail: $9.99
    Rainbow Price: $7.16

  • Item #: 008012
    ISBN: 9780825138522
    Retail: $26.00
    Rainbow Price: $19.95

    Students experience art through history by participating in projects highlighting techniques and styles through the ages. Comprehensive in scope, the book begins with prehistoric art and progresses through the late 20th century. Each major period (Ancient World, Middle Ages, World Beyond Europe, Renaissance, Baroque and Rococo, Romantic, Impressionism & Post-Impressionism, Early 20th Century, Late 20th Century) is further divided into periods, locations, or schools of art. Each major section and sub-section begins with background information to set the stage. Within each sub-section are one or many projects designed to help students understand and appreciate concepts and methods used in art of all kinds (not limited to paintings). There are 80 different projects in all. Materials needed for the project are listed first, followed by a sample of the artwork and narrative description highlighting the type of art, method used to create it, a particular technique or feature, etc. Directions and instructions are then provided for completing a project simulating the art or concepts. To get the full visual impact of works referenced you will have to find reproductions, since the author provides only line drawings of the art. This is purposeful, since the pages are intended to be reproducible student handouts - in some cases, artwork is done directly on the page. Projects vary from simple drawings to elaborate construction. A few are extremely ambitious, but rather accurately impart the amount of effort involved in creating the type of art being studied. So much is included here that the best I can do is describe a few projects. The first project is Prehistoric Painting. Students make earth-pigment powders using brick, unglazed tile, or rock that is easily filed. A flat stone is used for a "canvas" to recreate a simple cave painting of an animal. The outline is drawn in charcoal or charcoal pencil. Earth powders are mixed with honey (just like they did way back then), and used to color within the outline. Project #20 (from Gothic Art) is creating a stained glass window using tracing paper, felt tip pens, and black construction paper. During the Italian Renaissance period (1400-1600) projects include Shading and Foreshortening, Renaissance Composition, Linear Perspective, Fresco Cartoon (mimicking the process by which frescoes where outlined before being painted), creating a picture based on one of many of Leonardo da Vinci's observations and ideas, and making a model of one of da Vinci's inventions. Project #53 has students use broad felt-tipped pens to try out Impressionist techniques on a basic line-drawn scene. I'm sure students could come up with some outlandish ideas for the Dada art project (Early 20th Century), inspired by Man Ray's Gift (an iron with tacks fixed to the bottom - a study in irony). Students will come back to earth by Project #80 (inspired by Spiral Jetty, an abstract sculpture formed with rocks and earth in Utah's Great Salt Lake) which focuses on creating art from/in nature. Students create their own earthwork, planning a simple tabletop design using stones, sand, gravel, dirt, and similar natural materials. (I have an excellent natural "collage" on my window right now - I call it The Undersides of Many Tree Frogs).

  • Item #: 050020
    ISBN: 9780981999029
    Retail: $0.00
    Rainbow Price: $149.00

    What a treasure! I'm mourning the fact that I no longer have students in my home. I would love to go through this course with them. If there was anything even remotely like it "back then," I was unaware of it. This course combines music history (learning about composers) with music appreciation (learning about their music) and shows how they interweave with as well as impact the intricate fabric of western culture. The scope of the course is breathtaking a survey of 300 years (right before 1600 to the edge of WWI) of Western Music and Arts. The author, Carol Reynolds, is a well-loved professor of music history who supplies students with an abundance of primary and secondary sources and encourages her students to learn from them. The course she's provided is professionally well-done, comprehensive in its depth and scope, amazing in its use of musicians and cultural backdrops and, in short, magnificent. In her words, "the history of music makes sense only when it is combined with the history of science, politics, conquests, religious movements, and the other arts. . . . . Music has the ability to enlighten, enliven, and enshrine in our memory the interaction of history, science, and art."

    Just to whet your appetite, here's what's provided in the unit on Mozart: a lecture that includes pictures from the Big Band era and rock and roll (to illustrate the similarity in terms of musical change between the Baroque and the following period), examples of music played on a piano that merge into orchestral presentations, pictures of political figures, art, architecture, places, clothing, a "sub-lecture" that shows how a grand piano works, vocabulary defined, dozens of musical examples. Through all of this, Mrs. Reynolds' sweeping commentary takes us from Mozart throughout Europe and even colonial America showing us relationships and a continual historical perspective. While the workbook provides "notes" (dates, places, definitions, etc.), the student will need to pay attention to the lecture in order to fill in all the blanks. Questions involve extrapolation from the lecture rather than just a regurgitation of it. The lecture introduces many musical compositions; listening to required and recommended works will provide others, but it's expected that the student continues to learn by drawing on provided internet sources.

    There are 17 units:

    • Using music history to unlock western culture
    • Music entwined with great events in western history
    • Technology, terminology, and cultural perspective
    • Fanfare and power: the court of Louis XIV
    • Sweeping away the Renaissance into the Baroque
    • Liturgical calendar, street parties, and the new church music
    • A lively journey through the life of Johann Sebastian Bach
    • Enlightenment, classicism and the astonishing Mozart
    • In the abyss: the century struggles with unfettered imagination
    • Beethoven as hero and revolutionary
    • Salons, poetry, and the power of the song
    • A tale of four virtuosi and the birth of the tone poem
    • Nationalism and explosion of romantic opera
    • The absolutely new world of Wagner
    • Imperial Russia a cultural odyssey
    • Load up the wagons: the story of American music
    • Turning the page on western tradition with the explosion of war

    Course components include a set of DVDs (lively lectures that include "on location" film clips, interviews, and a wealth of information; professionally done) and a student Resource Book that will ultimately become a resource/reference for the student when the course is completed. Recently revised, the audio CDs that were previously included have been replaced by links on the publisher's website (www.professorcarol.com) to required and recommended musical works. The spiral-bound student Resource Book provides the student's path through the course. The pages for each unit provide a list of Key Figures and Places, Vocabulary, Notable Dates, suggestions for Listening (some of which are included on the CDs), and a listing of Websites for further research. The Putting It All Together section provides study projects for the student and the Viewing Guide provides a place for note-taking through the lecture series. Also included in the Workbook is a set of Quizzes for each unit, texts and translations for the music provided, and an answer key for both the Quizzes and the Viewing Guide pages.

    Although it doesn't say so, this course seems like it was developed with homeschoolers in mind all instruction is directed toward the student so a motivated student could work somewhat independently (although in my home, I would have wanted to be learning these things right along with my student). Easily a full high school credit in Music History/Appreciation, it might be more properly called by an old-fashioned name Humanities.

    The Teacher's Manual on CD-ROM is available separately and includes PDF files for the following: Syllabus, a unit-by-unit Course Plan, four Exams with Answer Keys, and a Listening Plan. Appendices include a Listening Selection Chart and a Listening Progress Form. Although not absolutely necessary, this does provide some nice features and gives the course a little more cohesive "feel." The publisher recommends the addition of the Teacher's Manual especially if taking the course for credit. ~ Janice